Aspies + Weed = True Love?

I wrote a blog post about weed before, and how much it’s helped Justin’s life.  We were both anti-pot when we started dating, but since it became legalized here in Washington, we both tried it, and I cannot begin to express how much it’s helped both of us (I can finally sleep).  I asked Justin to write what it’s like from his perspective.

pot

Weed, marijuana, pot, green, dope, Maryjane, whatever you call, it I couldn’t imagine my life without it now. All my life I was straight edge.  I’ve never even been drunk to this day and I just turned 35. I had only tried weed twice before I really started smoking it regularly 2 years ago. I have recently been diagnosed with autism which doesn’t bother me; I am still me, but I stress 24/7.  I worry about shit I shouldn’t, but with weed, I take one hit, and boom–that worry goes away. Not only that but I am more open and can talk to people I may not know as well.

Weed has saved me, honestly.  I’ve lived in Washington state for my whole life.  It’s beautiful here.  Forests, waterfalls, national parks, etc, and so much to explore.  When I was younger, I never explored.  I stayed inside and just played video games.  Since I started smoking pot, I wanted to LIVE.  I wanted to get out and start seeing this state, and explore, and we want to travel.  It made me see that you should stop caring about cell phones, TVs, internet, and realize it’s bullshit that’ll just hold you back.

Before I started weed I had a hard time telling my wife she was gorgeous or that I loved her just because stress or just forgetfulness. With weed, I tell her all the time.  I tell her that she’s hot right to her face, which is hard for me and was hard for me.  Weed takes away my “What ifs.”   Since I’ve been smoking weed, it has improved my mood and helps control my melt downs a little.

Weed also helps me with my eating—which can be helpful for parents with autistic children or teenagers.  I used to be a really picky eater.  Since I started smoking, I realized there are so many different types of food out there and I love to try new recipes—something I NEVER did when I was younger.  I also discovered I love to cook. I also can realize talents I have like mechanical work that I never felt like I had confidence for.

It also helps me focus on tasks.  Before I started smoking I would want to cross stitch, play games, watch a movie, and about 10 minutes into it, I’d start getting distracted and start thinking about 10,000 other things and never finish what I started.  With weed, it keeps me focused on just one task, and helps me finish.

It really bothers me when people who smoke weed are labeled as lazy.  What about people like me, with a brain issue that I can’t control?  With weed, I’m the opposite of lazy.  I can finally focus on things and relax and be myself.  I can also tell you this is not a “gateway” drug.  Tara & I have both been using pot for our issues, and neither of us have had a desire to start shooting up heroin or snorting coke.  She gets high and goes to sleep (wow, dangerous), and I get high and start being creative.  Yeah…really a scary drug, for sure.

I’m not saying everyone should start smoking pot, but from this Aspie’s point of view, pot honestly saved my life, and probably my relationship.  If you or a loved one is struggling, try it.  It might save their life, too.

Justin and Our Relationship

I love Justin.  He is my everything.  I asked him to write a blog about our relationship, and here is what he’s got to say.

Relationships

Yikes.  This topic is harder for me, because it’s more emotions, and as I am learning, I don’t know much about most emotions. I look at my relationship with Tara, and I feel like it’s something completely different from every other relationship I’ve ever had.  I can’t explain it, really–I guess it’s the knowledge she was the one to marry maybe?  Insert barfing noise here.

I guess I am not normal in the terms of how I view my relationship. With Tara I don’t feel like we have a relationship—it’s deeper than that for me.  She is my other half and I mean that in the way it sounds. There are days where I have to go to the doctor’s or counselor’s, and I hate it because I don’t want to speak and I don’t want to deal with society. With Tara, I am not scared at all.  If I go somewhere and I am feeling a little overwhelmed, I don’t have to say anything to her at all.  She can tell by my posture and my ticks that I’m overwhelmed.

A lot of people wonder why we work together so well.  We have only been in two fights ever. My past girlfriends–no offense to them this is just how they work–wouldn’t say how they felt or what they wanted, and that’s hard for me, so we fought constantly.  I don’t mean to be cold, but if you don’t tell me or show me you’re upset, I can’t tell.  With Tara, she’ll just tell me when she wants a hug or to be comforted, and it doesn’t bother her.  She doesn’t expect me to be a mind-reader.  Physical touch and hugs can be uncomfortable for me (more on that later), but I’ve gotten a lot better with her.

I use this story as an example: I was at my now wife’s house when we were dating.  It was close to my birthday, and she was framing my present.  I went over to her house and apparently it was on the ironing board right when I walked in.  Her heart sank and she thought for sure that I had seen it.  Well I was so focused on my phone or the floor or whatever that I didn’t even notice.  I had no idea and never even saw it.

I don’t think I could put my finger on just one thing in our relationship that makes it so successful; there are a lot of ways that we work. I want to expand my world, and she helps a lot with that.  I used to be one of those people that stayed in my house all the time, I never went to parties or really did anything outside of family camping, but Tara makes me want to get out and explore the state.  She helps me feel safe.

Another thing that’s hard for me is finding or picking something out. For example if we are going out to eat if Tara says where do you want to go my brain immediately things of every restaurant within 100 miles of us and that is insanely overwhelming, so it’s easier for me if she says what she wants or narrows down the choices.  Sometimes if I can’t decide where to go or what to eat I just don’t go out or I end up eating the same stuff I’ve had for a week.

I just love her.IMG_8749

Stimming & Justin

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(Us on 10/7/2017; at one of the most beautiful places in Washington state–Twanoh State Park)

I asked Justin to write a blog post about stimming.  We watched the movie The Accountant, with Ben Affleck, a while ago, and he does the stimming where he racks a piece of wood on his shins listening to hardcore music for 10 minutes.  I didn’t really get it.  From a neuro-typical point of view, it looks crazy.  This apparently is called stimming, which is sort of a self-soothing/stimulation thing for Aspies and Autism-spectrum people everywhere.  I don’t really notice now when Justin stims, and I know it’s something he needs to do.  His stimming behavior isn’t too out of this world–he just gets lost in music or does 15 things at once, and it seems to help.  I found a really good article about it:

Autism & Stimming

I recommend reading this.  It helps to understand why they do this & that it’s normal for them.

So I had Justin write about it, too.  Here’s what it’s like in his world.

 

Stimming From An Aspie’s point of view

Have you ever watched a really, really good movie that keeps you on the edge of your seat the whole time?  Or read a mystery novel that you just can’t even?  You know that weird tension you feel where you feel you gotta keep bouncing your leg or move to the edge of your seat, or just can’t sit still?

That’s how autism feels some days.  All day.  ALL DAY.  It’s not regular.  Some days I wake up just fine, and some days I wake up feeling like I want to run around the block 17 times.  I feel the odd tension and just have this weird energy.  Some people with Autism shake, or rock back and forth, or flail their hands and legs and arms.  But it’s only temporary.  I didn’t know what it was until recently, and it’s stimming.

Apparently I’ve been stimming most of my life.  For me, loud music is my go-to.  I don’t really care what kind of music it is (not screamo or anything like that), but I just pick the song or station, blare it (sorry, neighbors) and it takes me to a totally blank place.  I don’t feel my whole body, and I don’t have my usual billion thoughts.  I just feel better.  But sometimes I feel emotional afterwards, which is weird, and feel like I need to cry.  I haven’t figured that out yet.

Multi-tasking, or doing 10 things at once helps me too.  While typing this up, I also have a YouTube up with a football player’s biography and another YouTube up with my favorite band Korn playing in the background.  Some people can’t do this (my wife, for example), because it’s too much at once.  But it helps me a lot.  I am only focusing all my thoughts on this writing, but I also can hear all that and focus on the writing at the same time.  I also can get completely lost in researching things.  My wife told me about Chernobyl, which I had never heard of until I met her.  I got obsessed with learning about this, and spent hours losing track of time and completely sucking up all information I could find on this topic.  This was me 24/7.  I barely did anything else (except the music and other stuff in the background, of course!).

Up until I married my wife, I thought everyone could do this.  She can’t have anything on while she’s focusing, like on homework or something.

So if anyone you know is autistic or has Asperger’s and flails their hands or taps, that’s usually why.  Stimming helps us a lot.

 

Be patient with those who have this behavior.  You know how that anxiety can feel, and they feel it worse than the neuro-typical.  Don’t shame them for it, and just let them do what they gotta do.

Do you stim?  Do you know others who stim and what their self-soothing behavior is?  Share with us. We’d love to hear how others tackle this.