Physical Touch…the Aspie’s Archnemesis

I asked Justin to write what he feels and thinks about, as most of you know.  He wanted to talk about physical touch and what it feels like from their point of view.

Physical touch what’s that????? really EWWWWW

No really, I don’t understand physical touch.  To me, it just doesn’t really make sense.  I’ve never been one to hold someone’s hand or hug them.  Even in a moment of sadness I just kind of stand there awkwardly saying what can I do to help.  I know I look insanely awkward,  like I want to run the fuck away, but also understand I don’t want to be a douche nozzle. For me it’s really hard to explain why physical touch is so foreign and odd. It kind of feels like someone who touches me could control my every move, and before you say “Obviously, that can’t happen,” well, no shit.  That’s one thing that’s funny about autism.  I am incredibly smart and I have an insane memory about things that I am obsessed with.  But you’re also stuck with these things you do that you know is dumb and not true. Like no shit someone can’t control me they’re not Luke Skywalker.

If I’m having a meltdown, touching me is the worst.  It’s like a hot poker wherever I get touched—even if they’re trying to be comforting.  I start sweating and start to almost stress, because I’m not sure how to react.  This is also what it’s like if you randomly touch me—it almost startles me.  I know you aren’t doing it to be an ass, but it is a little weird to me.  I feel horrible with my wife cause I know she wants to hold hands and touch, but it is so insanely foreign to me.  I think she’s to the point now she does understand and knows I love her (obviously).

People also don’t understand how scary someone touching you can be when you are surrounded by noise and chaos even if things can be calm.  For example, my wife’s boss took everyone on a day cruise around the Puget sound where we live. We were on the top deck surrounded by the other employees she knows well.  Everyone was talking and moving and having a good time.  Their faces were different to me (even though I met them all), but I’m so focused trying to block out everyone else it’s overwhelming.  It can also be scary in public because I don’t know how long to stare at you before I am creepy Justin and you start getting weirded out.

I don’t know what to do with my hands, so I fiddle with my phone, goatee or anything.  I don’t have any idea what body language means—it’s definitely a different language.  If my wife wants  a hug or cuddle she pretty much has to just say “I want a hug, dummy,” before I get it.  If she tries to hug me or flirt with me I’m just like uhhhh….hey, what are you doing?  She has gotten to understand she just has to say it.  It’s almost like knowing only half the language of a place you’re visiting.  Like you know enough to kind of get around and ask where the bathroom is and stuff, but you don’t really know how to speak more than “Where’s the library.”  There are also times someone will say something nice to me and I brush it off its usually cause I had no clue what you were talking about at the time.  My brain processes some things fast and some things I take forever to get.  I also might hear you tell me a joke then when I get home I finally get it, and laugh randomly, scaring the hell out of my wife.

TIP:  If you’re hanging around someone who’s autistic and want to hug them or touch them, just ask.  Physical contact can be tough, so it never hurts to ask them.Capture

Justin and Our Relationship

I love Justin.  He is my everything.  I asked him to write a blog about our relationship, and here is what he’s got to say.

Relationships

Yikes.  This topic is harder for me, because it’s more emotions, and as I am learning, I don’t know much about most emotions. I look at my relationship with Tara, and I feel like it’s something completely different from every other relationship I’ve ever had.  I can’t explain it, really–I guess it’s the knowledge she was the one to marry maybe?  Insert barfing noise here.

I guess I am not normal in the terms of how I view my relationship. With Tara I don’t feel like we have a relationship—it’s deeper than that for me.  She is my other half and I mean that in the way it sounds. There are days where I have to go to the doctor’s or counselor’s, and I hate it because I don’t want to speak and I don’t want to deal with society. With Tara, I am not scared at all.  If I go somewhere and I am feeling a little overwhelmed, I don’t have to say anything to her at all.  She can tell by my posture and my ticks that I’m overwhelmed.

A lot of people wonder why we work together so well.  We have only been in two fights ever. My past girlfriends–no offense to them this is just how they work–wouldn’t say how they felt or what they wanted, and that’s hard for me, so we fought constantly.  I don’t mean to be cold, but if you don’t tell me or show me you’re upset, I can’t tell.  With Tara, she’ll just tell me when she wants a hug or to be comforted, and it doesn’t bother her.  She doesn’t expect me to be a mind-reader.  Physical touch and hugs can be uncomfortable for me (more on that later), but I’ve gotten a lot better with her.

I use this story as an example: I was at my now wife’s house when we were dating.  It was close to my birthday, and she was framing my present.  I went over to her house and apparently it was on the ironing board right when I walked in.  Her heart sank and she thought for sure that I had seen it.  Well I was so focused on my phone or the floor or whatever that I didn’t even notice.  I had no idea and never even saw it.

I don’t think I could put my finger on just one thing in our relationship that makes it so successful; there are a lot of ways that we work. I want to expand my world, and she helps a lot with that.  I used to be one of those people that stayed in my house all the time, I never went to parties or really did anything outside of family camping, but Tara makes me want to get out and explore the state.  She helps me feel safe.

Another thing that’s hard for me is finding or picking something out. For example if we are going out to eat if Tara says where do you want to go my brain immediately things of every restaurant within 100 miles of us and that is insanely overwhelming, so it’s easier for me if she says what she wants or narrows down the choices.  Sometimes if I can’t decide where to go or what to eat I just don’t go out or I end up eating the same stuff I’ve had for a week.

I just love her.IMG_8749

The Aspie Speaks!

For the first time ever, Justin wrote a blog post.  I want to share with you the view that we both have about autism and vaccines.  From someone with autism, here’s a perspective that I’d like you all to hear.

“I cannot stand the whole anti vaccine issue when it comes to autism.  People they say it causes autism, but if you ever research Andrew Wakefield (who said that they are linked), not only did that article get pulled and found to be fraudulent, but it also stated that he had facts.  Not to also add that he was banned from practicing medicine in the UK. So why would you listen to a man who lost his license?

Being Autistic, I find it horribly offensive when mothers say they won’t vaccinate their kids because they think it causes autism. It’s like saying I am a broken toy.  Should we be discarded just because we have autism?

I know that’s not what their point is, but think about it.  I have autism.  But I’m married and have been in a relationship for close to ten years with the same woman. I have worked multiple jobs, and my last job lasted for five years.  I didn’t promote or ever go too far within the jobs (counseling would’ve done wonders but I didn’t have health care) but I am a normal citizen who contributes to society.

So you’d rather your kid die from polio than have a kid you have to teach differently (and we’re learning new ways to teach all the time).

I do at times get frustrated with my autism, but I also look at it as a blessing.  Ask me about any horror movie and I am pretty sure I can talk your ear off about it without looking anything up. Same with my memory because of my autism I can still recall what my wife wore to our first date. Plus I know because of my autism I look at things from a completely different perspective, and I notice patterns and other things most “Normal Neuros” don’t see.

I just don’t see the whole point in avoiding these diseases like measles and that can spread just because you’re scared of one disorder.  Because I got vaccines, I can live to be an old man.  Some kids that don’t get vaccinated might not live past 40.

It just really pisses me off when I hear someone say that they won’t vaccinate their children and they don’t do the research.  They just go off the first TV show or article that brought it up.

Before you decide, go talk to a family or someone with autism.  Don’t judge, and don’t make a decision based on BS medical reports.”

Justin and I both have talked about this.  We don’t want children as you know, but if we did, we would vaccinate without question.  I’d rather my child be autistic than get measles or some other physical disease that could cause them to die at any time.

What do you think?

Vaccines

The Intimate Details

“Autistic people can’t have intimate relationships.”

“Autistic people can’t feel emotions or love.”

“Autistic people die virgins.”  (Yes, that’s legitimately a real statement)

I’ve talked about sex on here before…it’s a topic people avoid, but I don’t.  For some reason sex is given this “hush hush” attitude, when we should be celebrating it.  You’re trying to tell me that the closest you can get to someone is something we should almost be ashamed of?  Well, sir, I disagree.  This is something that we should celebrate.

When we first started dating, as most of you know, I didn’t realize Justin had Asperger’s.  I didn’t think he liked the hugging, kissing, snuggly stuff, and I was totally fine with that.  Just because someone doesn’t smoosh you with their lovey stuff doesn’t mean they don’t feel it.  A lot of people thought that we weren’t really close or comfortable with each other, but that certainly wasn’t the case.  I was comfortable with Justin after the first hour (and my dog also approved).

When it comes to intimacy, part of Asperger’s and being on the Autism spectrum does mean they have a hard time connecting and being able to display affection.  It made so much sense when he was diagnosed, because he does have a hard time with affection.  He doesn’t randomly hug or kiss me, or snuggle me, or that stuff (did I say I’m okay with that?  I promise…I am).  Since he started smoking pot, though, it’s really helped him with his confidence, and now daily he is more able to show his affection for me.  He kisses me and hugs me more, and I can’t support it enough (obviously).

Sex is something different for people on the Autism spectrum.  I see portrayals of Aspies and ASD people in relationships and sex is some foreign, weird thing for them.  Oddly enough, Justin said he’s never had problems with that aspect of a relationship.  I think because he can focus just on that, and it’s the easiest way for him to show his love.  How much more intimate can you get, really?

I will spare you the graphic details of it all (but it’s GREAT), but I want to get the word out that just because you’ve got an Aspie or ASD partner doesn’t mean that intimacy needs to be some foreign thing.  And even those without Autism.  Everyone should celebrate the joy that comes with being in one world for a minute with someone else.  Nothing else matters but that.

How awesome is that?

IMG_8693.JPG