More Ear Porn

Music isn’t the only thing that helps Justin stim.  Before Justin, I didn’t really listen to Podcasts.  Well, okay, I never listened to Podcasts.   Or talk radio.  I’m a music kinda girl, not a listen-to-people-talk-a-lot kind of girl.  I have, though, now been turned on to the Podcast world, and it’s pretty dang interesting.  I have a lot of self-help Podcasts I really enjoy.  Justin wanted to share how Podcasts help him stim too.

podcast

Podcasts

I’m a huge fan of talk radio.  I grew up listening to Loveline with Dr. Drew  and Adam Corolla (which helped turn me into a man, BTW), watched the MTV show, and listened to their show for YEARS.  I’ve always been into Podcasts.  When I got my first iPod, I spent hours downloading Podcasts.  I love listening to talk and seriously spend hours listening to them.  I listen to a lot of unexplained mysteries, too, like missing people (Missing 411 is so freaking fascinating), unsolved and ghost stories.  I listen to a lot of sports Podcasts too, like Brock & Salk up here in Washington (Seahawks and Mariners for life!).   As someone with Autism, it’s probably weird to think I like listening to people talk, but it’s true.

Silence is difficult for me as an Aspie.  My brain doesn’t ever shut off, so if it’s too silent, my brain can jump into negativity and will just ruminate in constant negative thoughts. Especially if I’m with people.  If it’s silent, I’ll start thinking oh, they must not like you or want to talk to you, so I start talking about random crap or something that they most likely don’t really want to hear or care about.  So when I’m home, I’ll be listening to a Podcast just so I don’t have to worry about thinking.  Though I just realized how creepy I must be–if I’m listening to a funny Podcast and randomly start laughing, it probably freaks everyone out that’s around me and wonders what the hell is wrong with me.

–Justin

 

Share your favorite Podcasts with us.  Do you know an Aspie who really enjoys talk radio or Podcasts?  Let us know in the comments!

–Tara

Music Ear Porn

Justin wanted to share how music = stimming and what it means to him.  How many of you can relate??

 

Music has gotten me through more things in my life than a counselor ever could.  I learned that music has been a stim for me just recently, without even trying or meaning to.  All through high school, if you saw me, 99.999% of the time I had headphones on and a CD player in my hoodie pocket (PS, It’s Washington, everyone wears a hoodie!).   The only time I really didn’t have headphones on it was class or if I was hanging out with my best friend Daniel.

My favorite genre of music is rock/metal, but I’ll listen to pretty much every genre there really is.   I listen to Britney Spears, Slipknot, Lamb of God, then suddenly switch over to opera (yes, opera) or rap.  I grew up listening to oldies on the radio with my parents, and any time we went anywhere they would turn on the oldies.

Describing me and music is hard cause I love it, in fact I live for music, but I couldn’t  sing you one bit of lyrics.  I know the lyrics–I research what they mean and what the artist meant by them, but I could literally memorize them and the second the song comes on–lyrics gone.  I have no idea what they’re going to sing.  I think that’s part of autism, but man, it sucks!  I always tell my wife that I’m jealous because she can remember the lyrics to songs she’s heard once (jerk lol!).  But I’ll listen to one song maybe 100 times in a week and not be able to tell you one lyric.  I also get beats of songs stuck in my head, which is equally annoying.  I don’t know the beat to anything (and God help you if you need CPR, because I couldn’t remember the beat to Staying Alive if you paid me).  This also means I have zero rhythm.  I realize I’m a white guy, so it’s okay, but I can’t even remember the song I just listened to or its rhythm.  I’ve also been known to listen to a song and get one little second stuck in my head– like the way a singer will enunciate a word or sentence, so I’ll rewind and listen to literally like a second or listen to it 15 or 20 times.  It’s kind of strange, but I think that’s part of the stimming of music.

If I’m having a particularly annoying Aspie day (as my wife calls them), I will blast music–usually rock, and it helps me calm down or relax a little so I’m not as wound up.  Up until recently I didn’t even know what stimming was, and music helps so much more than I could ever think it would.

–Justin

Music1

What do you guys think?  Music has helped me a lot too, but I can only imagine the ways it helps my Aspie husband.  Do you stim with music?  Leave me a comment!

–Tara